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Abstract

Results of Surgical Correction of Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome

Cynthia V. Torrez, BS (College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University)

Geraldine B. Hunt BVSc MVetClinStud PhD FACVSc, Associate Professor in Small Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006  Australia

ABSTRACT:

Presenting signs, breed predisposition and outcome after surgical correction of brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome were reviewed retrospectively in 73 cases. Stenotic nares were present in 31/73 dogs (42.5%), elongated soft palate in 63 (86%) and everted laryngeal saccules in 43 dogs (59%). Laryngeal collapse was identified in 34/64 dogs (53%) with records complete enough to permit analysis.  Breeds most represented were the Pug (26%), Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (20.5%), British Bulldog (19.2%) and Staffordshire Bull Terrier (5.5%).  Post-operative complications included dyspnoea (20.3%) necessitating emergency tracheostomy in 5 dogs (7.8%), cough (9.4%), infection/inflammation (6.3%), and vomiting/regurgitation (4.7%).  No dogs died peri-operatively.  Telephone interviews with owners of 46 dogs indicated that 26 dogs (56.5%) were much improved after surgery, 15 (32.6%) had some improvement and 5 (10.9%) showed no improvement.  Signs that persisted after surgery were snoring (73.9%), stertor/stridor (50%), excessive panting (28.3%), snorting (21.7%), and dyspnoea (21.7%).  Long-term outcome after surgery was good, even in dogs with laryngeal collapse.  Only one dog died from respiratory problems 3 years after surgery.

The Summer Veterinary Student Research Fellowship Program at Texas A&M University is funded by the College of Veterinary Medicine and awards by the Research Committee of the Texas Veterinary Medical Association and the Merck-Merial Veterinary Scholars Research Program. 

The University of Sydney Veterinary Centre Faculty and Staff supported the research project with their facilities, supplies, and time.